Monday, March 11, 2013

QuiltCon Quilt Show--A Lesson Learned

I've debated for days about even writing this post. I hope it is received with my true intent. I do not wish to discredit QuiltCon, the judges, or anyone else involved in quilt shows in general. These are just some thoughts I've had about my own experience. I believe that many of us had no idea what to expect when we shipped our quilts off to the show. This was a first-time show experience for most of us. I recently saw a quote on Pinterest that simply said, "Sometimes you win. Sometimes you learn". I definitely learned from this one.

Over the weekend I received these in the mail. I admit to feeling even more unsettled over the whole of idea of sending my quilts off to be "judged" than when I first sent them, despite the fact that I won two ribbons.

Three of my quilts were accepted into QuiltCon. Unraveled and Broken Diamonds placed 2nd in their respective categories. Only my NY Beauty mini was returned to me. The other two sold at the show. I was quite sad when I learned they sold since I had forgotten I listed them for sale in the first place. That was definitely another learning experience....

I knew on Tuesday from an email that I had placed at QuiltCon. The awards ceremony was Thursday. I obsessively followed Instagram all day Thursday until I learned that two of my quilts placed second. Rather than feel excited I felt pretty discouraged. I started to compare my quilts to every other quilt that came through Instagram that day. Initially I thought, "Well, why didn't I win first?" Of course I would prefer a $500 prize over a 2nd place ribbon. Then the negative thoughts started creeping in. "Why did I even place at all?" "Why in the world did I deserve 2nd?" There were many pictures of impressive quilts. I started picking my quilts apart. We are our own worst critics.

Finally, the voice of my previous agency director crept into my head. She was a woman with very strong opinions and sometimes said those opinions in a less than tactful way. Multiple times she attempted to motivate us by saying our job was like a beauty pagent. "If you don't win, you're just another Also-Ran." Let's just say that statement wasn't motivating at all, but definitely stuck with me. I started feeling like another "Also-Ran".

I was so frustrated at myself for degrading my own quilts in my head, especially when I was seeing the competition in 2" pictures on my phone screen. I finally stopped checking Instagram entirely for the rest of the weekend. I was doing exactly what I always try very hard not to do--comparing my work to others. This was one of the very reasons I wavered on sending my quilts in the first place.

When I received my critiques back on each quilt, I glanced at them and threw them away. The ribbons went in a drawer. I realized something very important through this experience. The critiques of those judges or their interpretation of my work don't really matter to me, nor does their decision that my quilts were 2nd place.

I quilt because I enjoy it. I enjoy sharing them here on my own space. I am thrilled when a reader tells me that something I have created has inspired them to create something unique to them. It honestly makes me feel bad that my quilt was considered "better" than another since I personally don't consider them better than any others. I'm truly grateful for those who have emailed me with congratulations for the ribbons, but what means even more have been the emails from those who simply said they loved my quilts and were inspired by them. The quilts and the people behind them are what matter, not the ribbons.

Two other judges may have just as easily looked at my quilts and made very different determinations. I am not in any way trying to say anything negative about this particular show or those who judged the show--only that this whole judging thing is simply opinion, and it's not for me.

I have no intention to enter another quilt show. I won't say "never" because you don't know what life will bring you, but at this point in my life I will create because it's fun, not because someone is going to look at the back and tell me I have "tension issues".... Obviously my machine needed a tune-up.

58 comments:

  1. Great thoughts and your quilts definitely inspire me:) keep creating for you!

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  2. I think the range of emotions you felt here is pretty normal :) Even when we know we create for ourselves, we are still vulnerable to other people's opinions. They may drive us crazy or make us feel good for a short period of time, but then we go back to creating what we love.

    I will keep entering my quilts in shows, because I really love to share my work in person as well as online and the short term emotional roller coaster is worth it to me :)

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  3. I hear you. As an artist, I have entered work into shows; winning totally depends on the who the judge is and where they are on their particular life journey. A piece of artwork that doesn't even get into one juried show can place first in another. I have a friend to whom that happened. It is all very subjective. As long as my self esteem and creative joy aren't tied to what someone with the title "judge" thinks, I'm ok.

    You create beautiful things! Thanks for sharing them on your blog.

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  4. Well said! I've heard from *many* people who were frustrated and disappointed in the critiques they received - I think it's important to remember that these are just opinions. Not fact. Not truth. Just what some other person thinks. And comparison truly is the thief of joy - glad you realized what really brings you joy from this process. I (and this is just MY opinion ;-) am always in AWE of your quilts and really appreciate all the joy and inspiration I get from the beauty you create and share.

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  5. I'm sorry to hear that this experience has caused those old "also-ran" feelings to bubble up for you, Kati.

    I definitely experienced many of the same thoughts and feelings you did, weighted very heavily toward the self-doubt kind.

    Here's the thing: I don't anticipate the judges' critiques (however harsh/not useful/bizarre they may be) will make me feel much worse than some of the stuff I've read out there in blogland. The posts I've been seeing that express confusion at the judges' choices have significantly exacerbated my feelings of "not good enough" and "I'm an impostor here" plus a dash of "I bet everyone is thinking of my quilts when they say the judges are crazy" (Not this one, by the way.)

    Having said that, the MQG put itself in an unfortunate position by selecting non-professional judges who didn't have experience judging quilts, at least not that I could tell from the bios, in any case.

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  6. your quilts are beautiful, original and inspiring! I have never entered any of my work, but can totally understand the range of feeling associated with having your work judged. You are right, you can take this as a learning experience...but also be very proud of what you have accomplished!

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  7. I loved the chance to see your quilts in person. They are wonderful and seeing them close up was such a great experience. For that opportunity I am grateful that you entered them.

    My quilt hung across from Unraveled, with one quilt in between us. I will send you unedited picture. I never once questioned why your quilt was second and mine did not get a ribbon in that category. I love them both but three quilts got to win and the rest did not. The thrill was that they were all hanging in the show, people were stopping to look at them and photograph them and ooh and aww about them. For me that was the whole point.

    I was surprised and not helped by the comments I received on either the quilt that did not place or the one that did and, and I just filed them away as new judges not understanding their role. I am sad for others who also received confusing and/or negative comments for quilts which are all so wonderful. I am sad, however, at the suggestions by many that the winners were not good either - we all know most of the quilts that were in the competition and they were competing against quilts of our friends.

    I too am not certain that I will enter a competition again. I did not come away enlightened or feeling positive from the judging part. I am thinking that quilt shows to just show the work might be better and a lot more fun. Because, I come back to where I started, I loved seeing those quilts in person. I did not spend much time at all at the vendors, I viewed the quilts in all my breaks at QuiltCon and I was enriched by that opportunity.

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  8. After entering many "projects" at many events I have finally come to this conclusion...I enter my quilts, cross stitch projects, needlework, etc. for the enjoyment of others. My grandmother never had the time to enjoy making anything like this, but she loved to go to shows and see everything. If no one entered, there would be nothing for her to see...so I enter, and if by chance I come home with a ribbon, I'm really happy. The best thing to do is stand in the corner and watch others look at your entry...that is my first place prize every time, seeing someone else enjoying and appreciating all the love that went into my project. Don't give up, just look at it differently.

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    1. This is a great way to look at it. I think of going out to see my Aunt's quilts is one of my greatest joys at fair time. Thank you for reminding us of this. Just like the earlier commenter said we should just have show to show our work!

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  9. Great post! As an interior designer, artist, and creator of beautiful things I get it. We are our own worst critics, but I know that I like feedback on my work...good, bad, or indifferent. Seeing all the pics and posts about QuiltCon there is a little part of me that wants to enter a quilt someday...maybe, but at the same time most of what I do, I do for me or friends or family. They love what I do for them and most days that's enough.

    I also have to wonder what kind of feedback they give. I teach design and it's not enough to tell a student what they did right and what they did wrong. You have to give more feedback than that. I am working on a quilting project right now that I'm crazy about and having a lot of fun with, but being new to quilting, I always wonder how could I make it better, and I'll look to my peers to get that feed back and the staff at my favorite fabric stores.

    Your work is amazing and inspiring, and I'm so grateful for all that you share in your blog with your fellow artists, crafters, quilters, and designers. Thank you!

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  10. All those feelings are precisely the reasons I have never entered a show. I like what I do, it makes my friends and family happy, and I get joy from that and that is enough. I will tell you that your work certainly has inspired me-and I do love looking at blogs and getting ideas. Ultimately, at least for me, the process of the creation is what makes quilting my favorite pastime of all time, not the idea of my work winning an award.

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  11. I think it's so good you shared these feelings that's the kind of blog I enjoy reading, a truthful one. I am sorry your old boss is still rattling around in your head you need to kick her out!!
    As someone that didn't manage to enter a quilt in the show I was regretful to not be a part of such an impressive group of modern quilts. I wasn't feeling regret about not getting a ribbon but being a part of the first year of something that I think is a big step for our modern quilting world. Hopefully the MQG will take critiques like yours into consideration for next year and learn from them. I also hope you eventually are up for entering a show again because your quilts are beautiful and inspiring even if there isn't a ribbon hanging next to them or a 2nd place one at that!

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  12. Kati-Thanks for sharing. I'm sure this was hard to put out there. I haven't read a whole lot about quiltcon since it happened but it seems a lot of people came away with some learning from the judging aspect of the show. Hopefully your quilts sold for good money and that will feel a little like a prize! I'm glad you are here and that you share your process because I've learned a lot from you in the past 2 years and have enjoyed reading along.

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  13. I didn't make it to Quilt Con, but I would've loved to see your quilts in person! You have such an identifiable style--when a picture of one of your quilts pops up in my reader or instagram or whatever, I can usually identify it as yours before reading your name. You are truly one of my favorite quilters, and you absolutely inspire me!

    Now, before I start singing Wind Beneath My Wings, I'll just say that your decision to avoid quilt shows in the future sounds like a wise one. From what I've heard, it doesn't seem like the critiques were particularly constructive, and you certainly don't need any ribbons to confirm how talented you are!

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  14. 'Your machine needs a tune-up'. Well said.:) Love your quilts and totally enjoyed this post.

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  15. I think your quilts are gorgeous! I choose to let my cat be the judge of my quilts. she never sees a miss matched seam,odd color choices or bad tension. keep your head up and don't let the judges squash your creative spirit.

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  16. I appreciate your courage to write and run this post. I know competition can be healthy, in certain situations, but in others, not so much. Like you, I've chosen to quilt and be crafty for my own enjoyment, to tap into my creative well and use it to increase my own enjoyment in this life, through visual reward, gifts, satisfaction and maybe an avenue to push my edges and grow. But I do not want to compete with anyone else as I do this. Like you, I do not want my gain to cost someone else a loss.

    Maybe one year they can just show quilts with no ribbons, just a chance to see, learn, enjoy and share.

    Thank you for speaking up about your own truth. It inspires each of us to think about what is true for us.

    Michelle
    in Seattle

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  17. You wrote an excellent post and I couldn't agree more. I have shown my quilt but never entered a competion for it to be judged. I make quilts for fun and enjoyment. You do beautiful work!

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  18. At one of the local quilt shows near me they give you the option to receive a critique, or not, and also to enter without being judged. Your quilts are beautiful. It would be a shame to not be able to share them an have others share their creations. Maybe a non-judged category would help?

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  19. You are right on. Thanks!
    I love your quilts, you are my favorite (I'm not kidding) "modern" quilter.
    Keep making what makes you happy, because the rest of us enjoy them, too. (-:

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  20. Kati,
    thank you for sharing your experience with this all as well. I for one, think your quilts were certainly "worthy" of awards and ribbons and accolades. They are some of my very favorites out there and I was not surprised at all to see that you won. I was so excited to "know" you and Lee and other friends who took ribbons home. So sad that you didn't remember you put them up for sale. But just know that they are continuing to be loved out there and you will continue to wow each of us with your immeasurable talent for design.
    I too was nervous about a juried show and I think I would enter a show again just to show but not to be judged. Because it is certainly the case that everyone has loved seeing the quilts in person or all together. But I don't need the second guessing or hassle of rewards or lack of them. Here's to a love of quilting that will outlast any show or competition!

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  21. I appreciated your words Kati. I am so sorry you forgot they were up for sale, that must have been a little bit of a shock. But Angela is right, they are still being loved. I love your quilts, you have such an amazing style!! I get excited every time you show a stack of fabric because I know your wheels are just turning and I can't wait to see what will come of it!! You are amazing, whatever you decide!! Just keep showing your creations here, and I will be ecstatic!!

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  22. You basically put my thought into words. It was my first time submitting to a show and I definitely learned that its not for me. I would rather continue to make patterns and teach people to quilt and encourage them to give it a try than worry myself of the insane quality of my quilts. I was excited to have a quilt in the show, but after I came home I just felt defeated and couldn't even explain why, then the letter came and I felt even worse. So I am moving on just as you with the hopes to help inspire those around me. You have definitely done this for me and I love your posts and your quilts, thank you Kati. p.s. I guess my machine has tension issues to ;)

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  23. IF I enter a quilt in a show (judged or non-judged), it is because I want to share my joy with others - the colors, the design, the possibilities - as others have shared their work for me to enjoy / learn from / be inspired by.

    Thanks for a thoughtful and well-written post!!!!!

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  24. When we went to get a gelato for my birthday, Paolo asked to try a certain flavor. The girl helping us said that it was really good. Paolo said it wasn't that great. Here comment was "tastes are tastes." We each have our own tastes, and our own way of doing things. Your "tastes" are inspiring to me (and others). Some people like your tastes, and others will have other flavors they like better. I will have to say that I'm so sorry that your quilts got sold. :( They are so beautiful.

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  25. I don't show my quilts at my LQS. You are blessed to be such a wonderful quilter. Congratulations for your hard work and that you sold those quilts for someone to enjoy. It's wonderful that your story ended so positive.

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  26. I feel sad that you and others whose work I enjoy so much had such a discouraging experience. It is so inspiring and breath-taking to walk into a quilt show as a spectator and be enchanted by the whole effect as well as by individual quilts. That's what a show is all about, and it frustrates me that quilt police and judging chase wonderful quilters away from sharing. Your quilts are incredible, Kati, and you are very gracious to share them so that others can see and be inspired. Don't let *anybody* make you feel like your work is less than the magical process that it is. One time I got a note back from a judge saying that the binding was not the proper width. What???!! I honestly just LAUGHED at such a ludicrous idea. That binding was exactly what it needed to be for that quilt. What a stressful, uncreative life that judge must have! I'm waiting for some quilts to get home from a show I sent them to in Florida. If there are any comments, I fully expect one quilt in particular to have something about tension on the back mentioned. I don't care. I honestly don't. I know that people enjoyed seeing the quilt, and that's what is important to me.

    That old boss of yours? She's dead wrong and has to have a very sad life full of angst and devoid of peace. You don't want to live that! Tell her shadows to stay in the past where they belong. I sure hope I get to see some of your quilts in real life again some day. It was a real treat to see the ones you shared at Hobble Creek.

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  27. Oh man, I am sorry the whole event gave you 'tension issues'! Your quilts are amazing and inspiring, and you deserved that to be acknowledged xxxx

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  28. Kati, I so resonate with what you're saying here and I admire your honest voice. Your quilts were a gift to be able to see in person and you are an amazing and creative quilter who inspires others generously! Thank you. I have so many thoughts on this topic too and feel my own blog post formulating.... may I link back to this thoughtful post of yours? Keep enjoying your creative process and please know how much it is respected and appreciated...... regardless of "tension issues"!!! :-)

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  30. Bravo! I enjoyed this post so much. Very well said.

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  31. It really depends totally on the judge, and some judges are better than others. I recently watched the judging for a local show. The judge chose Best Of Show based on "wanting to spread the ribbons around," Best Machine Quilting went to a quilt with major tension issues/thread nests on the back, and a pillow came back with the comment that it could have benefited from quilting--it was quilted, albeit in the ditch. Your quilts are definitely not worse than the ones that won first place, it was just the judge's opinion, and a different show would almost certainly yield different results. That doesn't necessarily make losing easier, but it should validate that you are an excellent quilter. There's no accounting for taste! :)

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  32. You and your quilts are super inspiring to this novice quilter! Thank you for that! I look forward to your posts showing us your beautiful quilts. For a little over a year, I have been teaching myself to sew and more recently quilt, from your blog and many others. You inspire me to take risks and to just go with what feels right and beautiful to me. Again, thanks for the inspiration and encouragement!

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  33. Competition can be good -- when it motivates you. But if it discourages you, well....

    Here's how I view quilting. I have a sister who is a wonderful quilter -- and she can make her sewing machine sit up and beg. Her quilts are marvelous -- yet she finds the nitpickiest mistakes in them. Stuff that I would consider "no problemo".

    I on the other hand am made from a whole different fabric line! My favorite fabrics to use are the smallest scraps. I don't like anything to match. I try new patterns all the time, and sometimes those instructions appear to be written in Greek with English letters, so I wing it. Often times, I find out in the middle of some "pattern" that I've made a mistake, and I consider it an opportunity to put my own personal stamp on the quilt. At the end of the day, when the quilt is finished, I always think it's beautiful ... because it's an expression of me. Your quilts are beautiful too.

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  34. Darcy (above) said that comparison is the thief of joy...that is so true if we let it. I love your work and have been inspired by it. I know that I make things and pick them apart and find all the little mistakes...I think I will stop doing that...not let comparison or my own nit-picking steal the joy I have had in the creation process. I know I have to create things...it feeds my soul and brings me joy. I am sure you are the same. Continue and enjoy!

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  35. Love your quilts and your blog. I make quilts for the pure joy, and especially love to give them as gifts or donations for fundraising for special causes, nursing scholarship and the Jimmy Fund. I have entered my quilts in the local guild show and have been a little disappointed when I didn't even get a second. Then I realized that it doesn't matter as the ballot box gets stuffed with votes by the quilters families. The more family, the more votes you get. Nothing personal and not judges, sew who cares. Keep doing what you do.

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  36. Kati,

    What a wonderful and thoughtful post. I totally understand what you are saying. That is why I have hesitated to put my quilt's in quilt shows. Your quilts are gorgeous!

    Your old boss is a downer and please don't have her rent space in your head. Because you have a great head on your shoulders and inspiring to all.

    Have a great night!

    Hugs,

    Linda Fieldhouse

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  37. I love your quilts and your blog. I have just recently fallen in love with modern quilting. This past weekend I went to my first modern quilt guild meeting. They had all entered quilts in a quilt show the week before. The discussion was all about the judging and how the judges were looking for things that are not usually a part ow modern quilting. While the judges were not rude or ugly several had their feelings hurt. One was a good friend who's wonderful quilt was given an ADEQUATE rating. After she saw that word she didn't even want to read the rest of the page. We discussed the fact that more judges need to be modern quilters. Keep up the wonderful work.

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  38. It really doesn't matter what the judges say; you quilt for the love of it. Yesterday I read another blog and the blogger felt exactly as you do. So Piffle upon competitions. Quilting, knitting, embroidery are not about winning contests; they are about the love of the craft.

    Good for you for tossing the comments. Your work is beautiful. Period. Piffle upon the judges.

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  39. HA! You neatly nailed it on the head when you said "Tension Issues". (After my first few shows I realized that Tension Issues aren't just about a stitch thang. I don't do shows anymore either.) Heh. Honestly though, like you, I really do quilt for ME, and to create from within. And to give things to people that will bring them joy, and warmth.
    Forget those judges. You're awesome.

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  40. I so understand your feelings. I'm getting ready to enter a quilt into a show here in Utah. I don't want it to be judged. I just want people to see my piecing and quilting. I have worked hard to learn what I have learned and most of it has been self taught. My self-esteem has always suffered so will I survive the judges? Your quilts are beautiful. And I agree with you. You do it just for those you love including yourself. Thanks for all you do.

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  41. I'm so glad I was able to see your quilts in person. Your awards were well-deserved!

    Before I received my quilts (and thus my feedback) back from QC, I entered one of my quilts in another show. I Found out that my quilt has been accepted, but after reading the feedback from QC, I'm not sure that I want to put myself through that again! I try to just make things that I love, but I think I will always look for praise from others as well.
    If I do follow through with this second show, it will be interesting to see how the feedback compares (it's a more traditional show with some really fun categories).
    I suppose I've learned from this experience as well!

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  42. I know how you feel- I did the Festival of QUilts last year which is the biggest show in Europe and I got some pretty derogatory comments from the judges which made me feel down about my work for quite a while (why did they not like my quilting style? How come I can never get quilts perfectly squared up?). I felt much better when I found blog posts around the internet from people who really liked my quilt and had taken photos. I then realised I wasn't doing it for the stuffy quilt police, nor did I ever expect to win anything, I was doing it to get seen and maybe someone would like it. And if even one person likes it, that's enough for me.

    So I'm going through it again this year- twice in fact- I only wish I'd not ticked the box that said I was happy to receive judges comments!

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  43. I read another post about mixed or bad feelings of being judged and all I could say (there were too much thoughts in my head) is "keep on sewing and enjoy doing so". I think that's what matters. I hope you continue to sew and inspire us, that's why I come here to see what you've created. Greetings from here, Franziska.

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  44. It's still great that you shared them with such a wide audience though! I have only shown my quilts in my small town quilt show. We have a "guild" with about 10 people in it, and all help volunteer to make the show happen. I know just about everyone who made each quilt in the show, and there are no judges, although there's a few "best of" handed out, including viewer's favorite. It's my kind of show... I like the Sister's Quilt show for that reason too... anyone can enter. I've never "entered" a quilt into a judged and jurried show. Probably never will. I have a very good friend who is an amazing quilter who tried to get 3 quilts into Quiltcon and all 3 were denied. IMO it's as much of a social clique as a quilt show, but that's just my negative opinion. It's still fun, but so subjective!

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  45. Kati, this was so very well written. I admit to really personally tearing myself down after I entered two quilts to QuiltCon and my entries were rejected. I LOVE those two quilts, and ultimately decided I was glad I didn't have to part with them. But honestly the internal struggle I went through after receiving the rejection email made me wish I had never entered them in the first place.

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  46. please, please, please NEVER degrade your work!

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  47. I love your perspective on your quilts. Your love of the hobby / art shows through.

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  48. I've never entered a quilt show before, but I've been through exactly the same range of emotions over the only bear show I ever entered, plus a number of camera club comps (they were internal ones, after that scarring I'd never have entered a big show!) A lot of these things are dependent on knowing what the judges are after, and catering to that, and the point at which I realised I'd started taking photos to suit judges was the point at which I quit the club altogether, because I wanted to enjoy my photography, not try to fulfil some very narrow, rigid guidelines set by some boring old farts who were still mourning the loss of film!

    Oddly enough, I am about to suck it up and enter a quilt show, because I want to help to get some modern quilts in the mix in the more traditionally orientated UK quilt show culture. For $7, I figure it's worth it to spread the love/colour and bin the judgement ;o)

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  49. I hope you already know that I am totally inspired by your quilts Katy and not just saying this to make you happier. Keep creating - you are one of the most inspiring quilters around.

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  50. I subscribe to your posts because I love your work and am so inspired by your quilts! I am so thankful you share them with "us". Thank you for sharing your thoughts too about the quilt show. Great perspective!

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  51. Congratulations on your ribbons. You are brave to even enter, but I am not surprised you did so well. I am not competitive at all and dislike competition of all kinds, so besides having in which I can compete, I would avoid such challenges at all costs. It sounds like you did learn a lot from it though. I am glad you love quilting for its own sake. I have no doubt that is why you are so good at it. You can see your love and passion shine through the artwork you create.

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  52. Blimey...Susan's clearly ad a good day ;-)

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  53. Oh...Kati, I love your honesty. I love your quilts and am sorry you have to give a couple of them up! ....yes, it is all a matter of opinion, couldn't agree with you more!

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  54. Kati - I am so glad you did enter them. I, for one, was very thrilled to see them in person. Your work is amazing and I will totally hold those ribbons for you if it's too stressful to think about, LOL!!

    Don't listen to that inner negative voice. Instead, listed to us, your cheerleaders :-)

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  55. You can go crazy trying to figure out why judges said what they did or chose the quilts they did. I enter quilts in my guild's annual show. It's not juried, you just have to be a member in good standing. There are no judges, just voting by members and attendees. If you win a ribbon that's cool, but mainly it's an opportunity to see examples of everyone's style.

    I think if you enter a show that's going to be judged, you need to see it as an opportunity to share what you do with a wider audience and not worry about the comments and ribbons.

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  56. This is why I love your blog. You are so honest and down to earth. Your attitude toward quilting is just like mine and you always have a way of reminding me why I do this! Many people would have taken the 2nd place and let it go to their head. You are using it to ground you and return to what you love. Kudos to you!

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  57. I was thrilled to see of all THREE of your quilts at QuiltCon. I volunteered during set up for the show and was excited to see them come out of the bags. This was my first time submitting and having a quilt in a show as well. I felt a lot of the same things you did after getting a ribbon, even. I distinctly remember standing in front of your quilts at the show, though, and thinking differently about quilting just physically being there and seeing the design work. Believe me, I was not looking at the stitches ;-) Even if it was a weird experience, I just wanted to say I'm glad you participated in the show! Thank you :-D

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